Thursday, February 25, 2010

A question that needs answering!

Ok costumey folk, I need some assistance and explanation.




This is a screen shot of the BBC wives and daughters mini series. The lady shown is the Lady Harriet.

WHY DOES SHE HAVE MAGGIE LENGTH HAIR!?!

(Note: This is the time period of those ridiculous large sleeves, the romantic era circa...1830?)

43 comments:

  1. Wearing shorter hair was a fashion trend of the Regency [although the image pictured is a bit extreme]. It was considered daring and was done to mimic the Greeks and Romans, but also because both men and women had worn wigs for over a century and thus there were few popular hairstyles.

    Here's a related story: http://madameguillotine.org.uk/2010/02/19/la-marveilleuse/

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  2. I've always wondered the same thing. I think it's hideous, and that actress is so lovely normally!

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  3. This particular style went by two names; the coiffure a la victime, named for those who had their hair shorn in preparation for going to the guillotine, or coiffure a la Titus in imitation of the Romans.

    I personally think it a very unflattering style.

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  4. I agree I found it very unflattering indeed, and I suppose it would make sense for the character of Lady Harriet to be bold and daring including her hairstyle, but she looked so lovely with curls, it was such a shame.

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  5. It was not uncommon then for a persons hair to be shorn if they'd been quite ill. Cutting off the long hair was thought to alleviate fever.

    Anyone who'd been extremely ill was likely to be sporting short hair for awhile.

    Plus, then it WAS a very, very trendy and daring style, not adopted by many women, and most of them would have been much younger...not older.

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  6. well ive ruled out illness because her being such a pivotal role in the film would have mentioned it, but ive had many people to tell me it was a daring style. Learn something new every day!

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  7. This does look really bad on this actress, and I was like "wha...?" when I first saw this film. I just assumed it was a daring fashion, too.

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  8. Its the worst kind of mullet ever executed. It was the mullet-precursor! Doom.

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  11. Greetings from another beginner costumer. I'm just getting into costuming for myself (as opposed to for school projects) and I found your blog very comforting/inspiring. I hope you find time to share your projects with us again soon! Hopefully I will have something to share soon.

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  12. I have to say that when I saw the series I was very much puzzled by that hair. It’s true that during Regency cropped hair was very much in vogue, though adopted only by the most fashionable and daring women. In the 1995 Persuasion Lady Russell wears her hair very short. I remember hearing somewhere that the style was chosen to show how cosmopolitan and trendy she is.

    What puzzles me is why Lady Harriet from Wives and Daughter has that style. The story is set in the 1830s or so and as far as I know the ultra short hair was no longer all the rage at that time. If anything, she looks about 10 years behind with that style.

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